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mulberry-cookies:

Marchesa Spring/Summer 2015(Details)

mulberry-cookies:

Marchesa Spring/Summer 2015(Details)

highheelsandcigarettes:

Marchesa - Spring 2015 RTW (Runway Details) | via Tumblr on We Heart It.

highheelsandcigarettes:

Marchesa - Spring 2015 RTW (Runway Details) | via Tumblr on We Heart It.

carolinelevybencheton:

Final dresses at Giambattista Valli Haute Couture AW2014/2015 show, pictures shot by me

bakerssmurf:

danalouiseg:

Since the first book, katniss was already a rebel.

bakerssmurf:

danalouiseg:

Since the first book, katniss was already a rebel.

bakerssmurf:

danalouiseg:

Since the first book, katniss was already a rebel.

I never even noticed this!!

bakerssmurf:

danalouiseg:

Since the first book, katniss was already a rebel.

I never even noticed this!!

The 66th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards Red Carpet (August 25, 2014)

athousandfacets:

HEATHER HENRY
ABOUT:
From an early age, Arkansas-born Heather Hahn Henry learned to appreciate craftsmanship. Growing up in Augusta, Georgia, though a self-professed tomboy, she loved playing with her mother and grandmother’s fine jewelry collection — from jade and cloisonné to broaches and cameos. Her father, a nuclear engineer whose career led the family to travel the world, was a talented welder and carpenter in his spare time.
Following graduation from Georgia Southern University with a degree in Sociology, Heather worked in Child Protective Services and Welfare. An impromptu move to Austin, TX, with its ever-present creative and artistic community, inspired her to change course — first to interior design and then to fashion, where she worked as a manager at a major department store.
In 2006, after marrying her husband David in Italy, they moved to Mexico City where Heather enrolled in metalsmith classes. Upon returning to Lubbock, Texas, where they now live, she continued her training as a goldsmith’s apprentice and accepted a position as Jewelry Buyer for luxury boutique Malouf’s.
She began to give her handmade pieces as gifts to friends, and soon after was participating in trunk shows, competing in art festivals, and selling in fine retail stores. Today, Heather’s passionate hobby has become her treasured vocation with Heather Henry Design, a luxury lifestyle collection of fine jewelry, minaudières and day bags inspired by the organic beauty of natural stones and raw elegance of precious metals.
She works between her small home studio and one in an artist’s enclave that is part of the Charles Adams Studio Project (CASP) located at the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts (LHUCA) in Lubbock, TX – a campus dedicated to the Arts and artists that was the vision of her husband’s grandmother, Louise Underwood.
Heather is an active member of the local arts community as a member of the LHUCA advisory council, Vice President of Friends of Music board, board member of Ballet Lubbock and board member of Medici Circle, which raises money for Texas Tech art students and programs.

athousandfacets:

HEATHER HENRY

ABOUT:

From an early age, Arkansas-born Heather Hahn Henry learned to appreciate craftsmanship. Growing up in Augusta, Georgia, though a self-professed tomboy, she loved playing with her mother and grandmother’s fine jewelry collection — from jade and cloisonné to broaches and cameos. Her father, a nuclear engineer whose career led the family to travel the world, was a talented welder and carpenter in his spare time.

Following graduation from Georgia Southern University with a degree in Sociology, Heather worked in Child Protective Services and Welfare. An impromptu move to Austin, TX, with its ever-present creative and artistic community, inspired her to change course — first to interior design and then to fashion, where she worked as a manager at a major department store.

In 2006, after marrying her husband David in Italy, they moved to Mexico City where Heather enrolled in metalsmith classes. Upon returning to Lubbock, Texas, where they now live, she continued her training as a goldsmith’s apprentice and accepted a position as Jewelry Buyer for luxury boutique Malouf’s.

She began to give her handmade pieces as gifts to friends, and soon after was participating in trunk shows, competing in art festivals, and selling in fine retail stores. Today, Heather’s passionate hobby has become her treasured vocation with Heather Henry Design, a luxury lifestyle collection of fine jewelry, minaudières and day bags inspired by the organic beauty of natural stones and raw elegance of precious metals.

She works between her small home studio and one in an artist’s enclave that is part of the Charles Adams Studio Project (CASP) located at the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts (LHUCA) in Lubbock, TX – a campus dedicated to the Arts and artists that was the vision of her husband’s grandmother, Louise Underwood.

Heather is an active member of the local arts community as a member of the LHUCA advisory council, Vice President of Friends of Music board, board member of Ballet Lubbock and board member of Medici Circle, which raises money for Texas Tech art students and programs.

athousandfacets:

Märta Mattsson 
about:
Sometimes I see beauty in things that other people find strange or are even repulsed by. I become fascinated when there is something you do not want to see and the feeling you get when you do not want to look at something, yet you still do. My jewellery deals with the tension that lies between attraction and repulsion. I take seemingly inappropriate materials, making ordinary and familiar objects seem extraordinary and unfamiliar. In the 18th century many new breeds of animals and plants were discovered and it was the main era of cabinets of curiosities. People collected rarities because it gave them the feeling of being in the presence of something extraordinary and marvellous. The cabinets of curiosities were not meant to sympathize with the creatures on display, only marvel over their oddity. In a world where not many new and exotic breeds are discovered I use dead creatures in my pieces to evoke wonder. The creatures are transformed and reborn; given a new life as objects of astonishment.

athousandfacets:

Märta Mattsson 

about:

Sometimes I see beauty in things that other people find strange or are even repulsed by. I become fascinated when there is something you do not want to see and the feeling you get when you do not want to look at something, yet you still do. My jewellery deals with the tension that lies between attraction and repulsion. I take seemingly inappropriate materials, making ordinary and familiar objects seem extraordinary and unfamiliar.

In the 18th century many new breeds of animals and plants were discovered and it was the main era of cabinets of curiosities. People collected rarities because it gave them the feeling of being in the presence of something extraordinary and marvellous. The cabinets of curiosities were not meant to sympathize with the creatures on display, only marvel over their oddity. In a world where not many new and exotic breeds are discovered I use dead creatures in my pieces to evoke wonder. The creatures are transformed and reborn; given a new life as objects of astonishment.

aechlys:

moomindeco:

Bijouterie Fouquet
Musée Carnavalet, Paris

Oh my god

No woman wants an abortion like she wants an ice cream cone or a Porsche. She wants an abortion like an animal caught in a trap wants to gnaw off its own leg.

Anonymous  (via sweetfilthpig)

Things men don’t understand #28464

(via izcon)